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observation Again three busy weeks and I envy my colleagues who had the time to write a blog post on a regular base.
Two major topics kept me busy:

  1. explaining the complete PLM scenario from concept (initial BOM), through CAD, through EBOM and MBOM to a final shipped product. I will come back on this topic in future posts as it even goes beyond my old post: Where is the MBOM. To be more detailed in the future
  2. analyzing ROI and predicting ROI for various PLM implementations. And this is the topic I want to share 2 experiences with you, and I am curious for feedback or other viewpoints

Where is my ROI, Mister Voskuil ?

No_roi Some years ago I supervised a PLM implementation and I only was involved after the company had already implemented their 3D CAD software (SolidWorks) after years of 2D AutoCAD. The reason for my visit was that the technical manager was a good guy in monitoring the productivity of his engineering department.

And then he showed me some statistics. Working with AutoCAD 2D was defined as the baseline. Implementing SolidWorks brought initially a drop in drawing output (pay attention to the wording) but after 6 – 9 month the started to be more efficient with SolidWorks and at that time the output was rated at 120 % (or sometimes even more due to more and enhanced product modeling)

Then came the SmarTeam implementation and again the output of the engineering department dropped and going down to 70 % and after one year effort of the SmarTeam implementing VAR, they were still not happy as output was below 100 % still.

point

Conclusion from their side:  There is no ROI on implementing PLM

In the following discussion we discovered that working methods of the engineers had changed. Less freedom in adding data, incomplete information as the integration with SolidWorks enforced a more strict methodology to the CAD users (who of course complained). The effect of the changed working procedures was however that downstream tasks should have been eliminated . In production preparation 4 people were in the past completing, checking the engineering BOM coming from the design department. They fixed the mistakes and then typed it all in another order into their ERP system for production.

quietIt appeared that those 4 people had a much easier job – first of all they did not complain. Data was immediately on release of the design sent to the ERP system – no manual interaction – and there they could pick-up the EBOM and adapt it for production.  There was less search work to do – as the designer already provided validated input plus there were no typos anymore. Amazingly these 4 people never complained to their management that they could do more, they kept on having their ‘busy’ days.

Morale 1: Measuring ROI in a single department (often an mid-market characteristic) does not give you a good understanding of PLM benefits. PLM, once implemented correct, affects the whole organization

We know there is ROI, but where is it ?

search As you noticed, a less confronting customer,  as we all feel being involved in a successful PLM implementation going in the right direction. Yes, perhaps a little to slow, but the advantage is that people start to see the benefits of a ‘single version of the truth’ – we haven’t reached the advanced scenarios yet as I mentioned in the top.

But now we tried to measure, as I also wrote in previous posts, if you had your organization under control before PLM, in that case you would be able to measure the impact – after 6 months / after 12 months / after 2 years ?

It is like climate change, statistics demonstrate there is a trend and I believe we have an impact on this planet. Still skeptics (luckily less and less) explain us that it is just a normal climate variation, and after 10 – 50 years we will have a new ice age. Not sure if these people are optimists or …….. it just does not fit in their lives

But PLM is somehow the same, we see it has impact, we measure and try to explain, specially in the mid-market companies, skeptics is a natural survival mechanism as you cannot risk to be too optimistic. (This is how startup’

quiet2 So in our situation we started to fill in spreadsheets which brought huge benefits. Imagine searching goes much faster – let’s say instead of 1 hour per day we need only 10 minutes per day per employee. We have 120 people per day searching for data, does it mean we can do it with 20 people instead ? Or what would these people do in the remaining 50 minutes per hour ?

Right, they will find other work to do – less stress, more time to chat with colleagues, have a coffee and above all they won’t complain. People are flexible in filling their day and if the company is lucky some of the ambitious people might fill their day with innovation or other relevant improvements.

Morale 2: Even if there is indisputable ROI on a PLM implementation, the management should analyze what should be the impact on the organization. Invest more in creativity / engineering instead of quality assurance ? In the mid-market this might be perceived as a bad sign – as quality is key. But how much money would we make on a high quality product that no-body buys anymore.

Conclusion: With these two anecdotes I tried to share my ROI struggle which is still following PLM.  I am looking forward for more anecdotes or inputs on the soft side of ROI. Be welcomed to join the discussion

And to stay in the mood – enjoy with Dilbert

This week was again a week with several customer visits and discussions around PLM implementations. As analysts like CIMdata, AMR Research, the Aberdeen group are all claiming that PLM will be the next thing for small and medium manufacturing companies, the discussion around PLM is on-going. Of course PLM vendors are adapting their messaging and sometimes their products towards the SMB.

Some vendors like PTC and UGS try to downscale their existing products mainly by changing the packaging of the product (but it remains a PLM system originally designed for enterprises) others like Dassault Systemes have a special SMB offering with full PLM capabilities, ENOVIA SmarTeam.

But let’s assume we have the ideal PLM solution for an SMB company. This was the startpoint, I had during my meetings this week.  How would you motivate a company to implement PLM, knowing all the constraints of SMB companies. Miki Lumnitz wrote about it in his blog –PLM for SMB who are those companies ?

I noticed one of the main issues for discussion is the handling of the MBOM (Manufacturing BOM). So let’s look at the different view points in a company.

EBOM (Engineering Bill Of Materials)

 “The EBOM reflects the way a product was functionally designed”

When engineers define a product, they design (or reuse) assemblies (modules) and add new parts and assemblies to the design. When working with a 3D CAD system, saving the product results in a document structure which resembles a lot the engineering BOM. Traditionally companies got the impression that by changing this EBOM structure a little, they would have a structure ready for manufacturing, called the MBOM.

MBOM (Manufacturing Bill of Materials)

image “The MBOM reflects the way a product will be manufactured”

The MBOM is a structure derived from the EBOM. Main changes from EBOM to MBOM are:

  • removal of subassemblies that do not exist in the physical world. For example a grouping of two parts which are logically grouped by the designer, but as a group do not make sense for manufacturing (Assembly B). And in addition of non-design items which are needed for manufacturing the product. For example paint or grease. (Item F)

Traditionally – and also in the companies I was visiting – the EBOM is domain for the engineering department and with additional modifications they provide a BOM (is it EBOM or MBOM ?) to the ERP system.  Some companies add non-engineering items to their design – they draw a can of paint in their design to make sure the paint is part of the BOM . Some work with phantom production order to address the usage of subassemblies by engineering.

image

Both EBOM and MBOM definition are preparations before production can start. The EBOM and MBOM contain the product knowledge how to build and how to manufacture a product. For that reason they should be handled in the PLM system. The main reasons for that are:

  • during process engineering there is a need to use, analyze and sometimes adapt engineering data. This can be done in the most efficient way within one system where all product data is available
  • PLM systems, like ENOVIA SmarTeam contain tools to create quickly based on certain rules a MBOM derived from the EBOM and when changes occur even compare both structures again, to adapt to these changes
  • Having a single environment for product definition and manufacturing improves the total product understanding

So where is the MBOM ?

Ask yourself as a company ” where do I handle the MBOM ?”  Some of you might say, we do not have an MBOM as our EBOM with some modifications is already good enough for manufacturing.  Many companies might say, we manage the MBOM in the ERP system as this is (was) the only system we had where we could define such structures. These companies are candidate for improving their Concept to Manufacturing process, as for sure either users or working methods are compromised to work with the MBOM in the ERP system.

image

Some might says: Do we still need ERP systems ?

Yes, as ERP systems are built to schedule and execute the production of well defined products in the most efficient way. ERP systems are needed for the execution, often the core activity for manufacturing systems.

PLM systems are reason that ERP systems can execute, they bring the product definition and information to produce a product. And in case the company designs and manufactures excellent and innovative products the future is bright.

But we should not consider engineering activities in the same way as production activities.

Einstein once said (and he is not an expert anyway):

Innovation is not the product of logical thought, even though the final product is tied to a logical structure

I am curious to learn where your manage your MBOM

ECC
Last week I visited the ECC in Munich, a conference where around 1000 people attended. It was an excellent event for networking and being in touch with customers, implementers of the ENOVIA brand. The V6 announcement and demonstrations were the major key-note sessions and they showed the focus on real global collaboration for big enterprises.

In the industrial tracks I followed the Aerospace / Defense track (approx 80 attendees), where European companies like Airbus, Aermacchi and Messier-Dowty gave their status and vision on their core development processes, supported by sessions from IBM and Dassault Systems.

imageInteresting to learn from this session was that all agree that the classical hierarchical structure in the supply chain will disappear and that it will be more and more a network of suppliers working together, with much more responsibility and risk sharing for the supply chain partners.  This higher responsibility and risk requires supplier to work with a PDM system too, and Airbus stated that for future contracts with suppliers this is a must – either integrated or interfaced.

Suppliers who do not meet these quality standards by having PLM implemented will not get new contracts anymore and in the next three years we will see a change in the supplier network and collaboration technology, based on solutions upcoming from Dassault and other software suppliers.

On the second day I attended the ENOVIA SmarTeam track (approx 100 people) where beside the current roadmap an interesting scenario was explained how the smaller and medium enterprises could work on V5 but thanks to the coexistence capabilities of V6 could collaborate with V6 companies or even inside their company could work on both levels in the future. It will be interesting to follow this approach.

Finally on June 9th the European soccer championship started. The Dutch team did not perform well during the qualification rounds and we were all afraid for the real tournament.

But miracles still happen – enjoy

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